Portrait of Bryan Stevenson, founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, at The NYU Law Furman Hall in Manhattan, New York. Stevenson is a widely acclaimed public interest lawyer who has dedicated his career to helping the poor, the incarcerated and the condemned.

Portrait of Bryan Stevenson, founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, at The NYU Law Furman Hall in Manhattan, New York. Stevenson is a widely acclaimed public interest lawyer who has dedicated his career to helping the poor, the incarcerated and the condemned.

 Rev. Mary J. Gunther leads a prayer at the center of the Christ Ministries Baptist Church in Ellenville, New York. The church prayed for the end of financial woes and improved health for its members.

Rev. Mary J. Gunther leads a prayer at the center of the Christ Ministries Baptist Church in Ellenville, New York. The church prayed for the end of financial woes and improved health for its members.

 Alex Miller in the dugout at the New Springville Little League complex in Staten Island, New York.

Alex Miller in the dugout at the New Springville Little League complex in Staten Island, New York.

 Vivian Tatham. Prospect Park. Brooklyn, New York.

Vivian Tatham. Prospect Park. Brooklyn, New York.

  Clarence Harrison  was wrongly convicted in 1987 for the kidnapping, rape, and robbery of a 25 year old woman in Decatur, Georgia. The rape victim and the person who gave the police a tip both picked Clarence out in the police lineup. Clarence was sentenced to life in prison based on identification. In 2003 Clarence wrote the Georgia Innocents Project stating that he was innocent. Interns from Georgia State and Emory college of Law began their investigation and found that Clarence was innocent based on DNA testing. "Regardless of the lost 18 years of my life, always having to traveling with an alibi, and missing my mothers funeral. I am proud to be alive and to have my life back," said Clarence. 

Clarence Harrison was wrongly convicted in 1987 for the kidnapping, rape, and robbery of a 25 year old woman in Decatur, Georgia. The rape victim and the person who gave the police a tip both picked Clarence out in the police lineup. Clarence was sentenced to life in prison based on identification. In 2003 Clarence wrote the Georgia Innocents Project stating that he was innocent. Interns from Georgia State and Emory college of Law began their investigation and found that Clarence was innocent based on DNA testing. "Regardless of the lost 18 years of my life, always having to traveling with an alibi, and missing my mothers funeral. I am proud to be alive and to have my life back," said Clarence. 

 Ezra Ritchin, head of the Bronx Freedom Fund, outside the Bronx County Hall of Justice.  Story Link here:  The New York Times .

Ezra Ritchin, head of the Bronx Freedom Fund, outside the Bronx County Hall of Justice.

Story Link here: The New York Times.

 Chirlane McCray in the backyard of Gracie Mansion; she has taken on a far more expansive role in guiding city government than previous first ladies of New York.  Story Link  here .

Chirlane McCray in the backyard of Gracie Mansion; she has taken on a far more expansive role in guiding city government than previous first ladies of New York.

Story Link here.

 Clinton Hughes, a lawyer at the Legal Aid Society, is part of a team that has challenged the admissibility of DNA results from the two disputed techniques.  Story Link  here .

Clinton Hughes, a lawyer at the Legal Aid Society, is part of a team that has challenged the admissibility of DNA results from the two disputed techniques.

Story Link here.

 Mr. Herskovic, at home in Brooklyn, is appealing his conviction. He said he agreed to give a DNA sample to the police because he expected it to show he was innocent. “I said, ‘Go ahead, take it!’”  Story Link  here .

Mr. Herskovic, at home in Brooklyn, is appealing his conviction. He said he agreed to give a DNA sample to the police because he expected it to show he was innocent. “I said, ‘Go ahead, take it!’”

Story Link here.

 Columbia Professor Frances Negrón at the Rare Books and Manuscript Library at Columbia University Butler Library. 

Columbia Professor Frances Negrón at the Rare Books and Manuscript Library at Columbia University Butler Library. 

 Detective Specialist Thomas W. Troppmann, center, and his partner Detective Specialist Edwin A. Rodriguez at the 34th Precinct in Upper Manhattan.Rodriguez and Troppmann are Neighborhood Coordinating Officers in the precinct who interact directly with the surrounding community in order to improve police and community relations to reduce crime.  Story link  here .

Detective Specialist Thomas W. Troppmann, center, and his partner Detective Specialist Edwin A. Rodriguez at the 34th Precinct in Upper Manhattan.Rodriguez and Troppmann are Neighborhood Coordinating Officers in the precinct who interact directly with the surrounding community in order to improve police and community relations to reduce crime.

Story link here.

 Revon Bailey. Brooklyn, New York.     Story link  here .

Revon Bailey. Brooklyn, New York.

 

Story link here.

 Lauren Vuong with Dan Hanson, left, and Ken Nelson, during reunion of Vietnamese refugees known as the “boat people” and some of the seamen who had rescued them.     Story link  here .

Lauren Vuong with Dan Hanson, left, and Ken Nelson, during reunion of Vietnamese refugees known as the “boat people” and some of the seamen who had rescued them.

 

Story link here.

 Artist Francks Francois Décéus. Brooklyn, New York.

Artist Francks Francois Décéus. Brooklyn, New York.

 Artist Mary Ann Carroll poses for a portrait after her presentation and exhibition at the Carrollwood Cultural Center Friday August 8, 2014. Mary Ann Carroll is the sole woman in the group of artists knows as the Florida Highwaymen. "I was greatly influenced by Norman Rockwell. I am trying to make my work look real like his. I haven't had time to study portraiture work because I have been too busy doing what I do," Mary Ann Carroll said when asked about doing more portrait paintings. Carroll held a Q&A section, an autograph session, followed by displaying and selling her artwork.

Artist Mary Ann Carroll poses for a portrait after her presentation and exhibition at the Carrollwood Cultural Center Friday August 8, 2014. Mary Ann Carroll is the sole woman in the group of artists knows as the Florida Highwaymen. "I was greatly influenced by Norman Rockwell. I am trying to make my work look real like his. I haven't had time to study portraiture work because I have been too busy doing what I do," Mary Ann Carroll said when asked about doing more portrait paintings. Carroll held a Q&A section, an autograph session, followed by displaying and selling her artwork.

 Actor  Tom Ligon  in his home in the Greenwich Village near the window an intruder tried to come through in New York, New York.     Story link  here .

Actor Tom Ligon in his home in the Greenwich Village near the window an intruder tried to come through in New York, New York.

 

Story link here.

 David First, in his Brooklyn apartment, led the noise-rock band the Notekillers, who played the New York music scene in the late 1970s and early ‘80s.  Part of The New York Times Story:   'Revival for the Notekillers'

David First, in his Brooklyn apartment, led the noise-rock band the Notekillers, who played the New York music scene in the late 1970s and early ‘80s.

Part of The New York Times Story:

'Revival for the Notekillers'

 Lila Laporte at her apartment in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn. “I love people, helping people,” she said. “I love taking care of people.”  Part of New York Times Story:   'The Neediest Case Series'

Lila Laporte at her apartment in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn. “I love people, helping people,” she said. “I love taking care of people.”

Part of New York Times Story:

'The Neediest Case Series'

  Dr. Rahraw Omarzad  founder of the Centre for Contemporary Art Afghanistan in Kabul, Afghanistan. In 2006 Omarzad established the only women’s art center in Afghanistan. “We taught women how to drawing and after three months we gave them hints of conceptual art and creative painting. Their art work shows the struggle and sacrifice of woman over time and is strictly open for interpretation,” said Dr. Omarzad.  Story link h ere .

Dr. Rahraw Omarzad founder of the Centre for Contemporary Art Afghanistan in Kabul, Afghanistan. In 2006 Omarzad established the only women’s art center in Afghanistan. “We taught women how to drawing and after three months we gave them hints of conceptual art and creative painting. Their art work shows the struggle and sacrifice of woman over time and is strictly open for interpretation,” said Dr. Omarzad.

Story link here.

 Walter Gerhard  Hoyerswerda, Germany.

Walter Gerhard

Hoyerswerda, Germany.

  Ivete Sangalo  photographed in New York City. She talked about her desire to cross over, as well as what it is that makes her music so appealing to the Brazilian mainstream.  Story can be found  Here                

Ivete Sangalo photographed in New York City. She talked about her desire to cross over, as well as what it is that makes her music so appealing to the Brazilian mainstream.

Story can be found Here

 

 

 

 

 

 Dean Bell at Paley Park in Manhattan. At the age of 40 Dean is on a mission to complete all six major marathons in one year; Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago, and New York. "Once I started I just asked myself, why stop," said Dean. Dean wakes up early each morning to train by running at least a 7K before starting work as an accountant. "I love it and it is my way of releasing stress. It is the only time I have control. No phone, no work. Just me and myself," said Dean. "Its my therapy and I cannot imagine my life without it." 

Dean Bell at Paley Park in Manhattan. At the age of 40 Dean is on a mission to complete all six major marathons in one year; Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago, and New York. "Once I started I just asked myself, why stop," said Dean. Dean wakes up early each morning to train by running at least a 7K before starting work as an accountant. "I love it and it is my way of releasing stress. It is the only time I have control. No phone, no work. Just me and myself," said Dean. "Its my therapy and I cannot imagine my life without it." 

 President Randy K. Avent at Florida Polytechnic University in Lakeland, Florida.

President Randy K. Avent at Florida Polytechnic University in Lakeland, Florida.

 Young Love.   Washington D.C.

Young Love. 

Washington D.C.

 Portrait of Bryan Stevenson, founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, at The NYU Law Furman Hall in Manhattan, New York. Stevenson is a widely acclaimed public interest lawyer who has dedicated his career to helping the poor, the incarcerated and the condemned.
 Rev. Mary J. Gunther leads a prayer at the center of the Christ Ministries Baptist Church in Ellenville, New York. The church prayed for the end of financial woes and improved health for its members.
 Alex Miller in the dugout at the New Springville Little League complex in Staten Island, New York.
 Vivian Tatham. Prospect Park. Brooklyn, New York.
  Clarence Harrison  was wrongly convicted in 1987 for the kidnapping, rape, and robbery of a 25 year old woman in Decatur, Georgia. The rape victim and the person who gave the police a tip both picked Clarence out in the police lineup. Clarence was sentenced to life in prison based on identification. In 2003 Clarence wrote the Georgia Innocents Project stating that he was innocent. Interns from Georgia State and Emory college of Law began their investigation and found that Clarence was innocent based on DNA testing. "Regardless of the lost 18 years of my life, always having to traveling with an alibi, and missing my mothers funeral. I am proud to be alive and to have my life back," said Clarence. 
 Ezra Ritchin, head of the Bronx Freedom Fund, outside the Bronx County Hall of Justice.  Story Link here:  The New York Times .
 Chirlane McCray in the backyard of Gracie Mansion; she has taken on a far more expansive role in guiding city government than previous first ladies of New York.  Story Link  here .
 Clinton Hughes, a lawyer at the Legal Aid Society, is part of a team that has challenged the admissibility of DNA results from the two disputed techniques.  Story Link  here .
 Mr. Herskovic, at home in Brooklyn, is appealing his conviction. He said he agreed to give a DNA sample to the police because he expected it to show he was innocent. “I said, ‘Go ahead, take it!’”  Story Link  here .
 Columbia Professor Frances Negrón at the Rare Books and Manuscript Library at Columbia University Butler Library. 
 Detective Specialist Thomas W. Troppmann, center, and his partner Detective Specialist Edwin A. Rodriguez at the 34th Precinct in Upper Manhattan.Rodriguez and Troppmann are Neighborhood Coordinating Officers in the precinct who interact directly with the surrounding community in order to improve police and community relations to reduce crime.  Story link  here .
 Revon Bailey. Brooklyn, New York.     Story link  here .
 Lauren Vuong with Dan Hanson, left, and Ken Nelson, during reunion of Vietnamese refugees known as the “boat people” and some of the seamen who had rescued them.     Story link  here .
 Artist Francks Francois Décéus. Brooklyn, New York.
 Artist Mary Ann Carroll poses for a portrait after her presentation and exhibition at the Carrollwood Cultural Center Friday August 8, 2014. Mary Ann Carroll is the sole woman in the group of artists knows as the Florida Highwaymen. "I was greatly influenced by Norman Rockwell. I am trying to make my work look real like his. I haven't had time to study portraiture work because I have been too busy doing what I do," Mary Ann Carroll said when asked about doing more portrait paintings. Carroll held a Q&A section, an autograph session, followed by displaying and selling her artwork.
 Actor  Tom Ligon  in his home in the Greenwich Village near the window an intruder tried to come through in New York, New York.     Story link  here .
 David First, in his Brooklyn apartment, led the noise-rock band the Notekillers, who played the New York music scene in the late 1970s and early ‘80s.  Part of The New York Times Story:   'Revival for the Notekillers'
 Lila Laporte at her apartment in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn. “I love people, helping people,” she said. “I love taking care of people.”  Part of New York Times Story:   'The Neediest Case Series'
  Dr. Rahraw Omarzad  founder of the Centre for Contemporary Art Afghanistan in Kabul, Afghanistan. In 2006 Omarzad established the only women’s art center in Afghanistan. “We taught women how to drawing and after three months we gave them hints of conceptual art and creative painting. Their art work shows the struggle and sacrifice of woman over time and is strictly open for interpretation,” said Dr. Omarzad.  Story link h ere .
 Walter Gerhard  Hoyerswerda, Germany.
  Ivete Sangalo  photographed in New York City. She talked about her desire to cross over, as well as what it is that makes her music so appealing to the Brazilian mainstream.  Story can be found  Here                
 Dean Bell at Paley Park in Manhattan. At the age of 40 Dean is on a mission to complete all six major marathons in one year; Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago, and New York. "Once I started I just asked myself, why stop," said Dean. Dean wakes up early each morning to train by running at least a 7K before starting work as an accountant. "I love it and it is my way of releasing stress. It is the only time I have control. No phone, no work. Just me and myself," said Dean. "Its my therapy and I cannot imagine my life without it." 
 President Randy K. Avent at Florida Polytechnic University in Lakeland, Florida.
 Young Love.   Washington D.C.

Portrait of Bryan Stevenson, founder and Executive Director of the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, at The NYU Law Furman Hall in Manhattan, New York. Stevenson is a widely acclaimed public interest lawyer who has dedicated his career to helping the poor, the incarcerated and the condemned.

Rev. Mary J. Gunther leads a prayer at the center of the Christ Ministries Baptist Church in Ellenville, New York. The church prayed for the end of financial woes and improved health for its members.

Alex Miller in the dugout at the New Springville Little League complex in Staten Island, New York.

Vivian Tatham. Prospect Park. Brooklyn, New York.

Clarence Harrison was wrongly convicted in 1987 for the kidnapping, rape, and robbery of a 25 year old woman in Decatur, Georgia. The rape victim and the person who gave the police a tip both picked Clarence out in the police lineup. Clarence was sentenced to life in prison based on identification. In 2003 Clarence wrote the Georgia Innocents Project stating that he was innocent. Interns from Georgia State and Emory college of Law began their investigation and found that Clarence was innocent based on DNA testing. "Regardless of the lost 18 years of my life, always having to traveling with an alibi, and missing my mothers funeral. I am proud to be alive and to have my life back," said Clarence. 

Ezra Ritchin, head of the Bronx Freedom Fund, outside the Bronx County Hall of Justice.

Story Link here: The New York Times.

Chirlane McCray in the backyard of Gracie Mansion; she has taken on a far more expansive role in guiding city government than previous first ladies of New York.

Story Link here.

Clinton Hughes, a lawyer at the Legal Aid Society, is part of a team that has challenged the admissibility of DNA results from the two disputed techniques.

Story Link here.

Mr. Herskovic, at home in Brooklyn, is appealing his conviction. He said he agreed to give a DNA sample to the police because he expected it to show he was innocent. “I said, ‘Go ahead, take it!’”

Story Link here.

Columbia Professor Frances Negrón at the Rare Books and Manuscript Library at Columbia University Butler Library. 

Detective Specialist Thomas W. Troppmann, center, and his partner Detective Specialist Edwin A. Rodriguez at the 34th Precinct in Upper Manhattan.Rodriguez and Troppmann are Neighborhood Coordinating Officers in the precinct who interact directly with the surrounding community in order to improve police and community relations to reduce crime.

Story link here.

Revon Bailey. Brooklyn, New York.

 

Story link here.

Lauren Vuong with Dan Hanson, left, and Ken Nelson, during reunion of Vietnamese refugees known as the “boat people” and some of the seamen who had rescued them.

 

Story link here.

Artist Francks Francois Décéus. Brooklyn, New York.

Artist Mary Ann Carroll poses for a portrait after her presentation and exhibition at the Carrollwood Cultural Center Friday August 8, 2014. Mary Ann Carroll is the sole woman in the group of artists knows as the Florida Highwaymen. "I was greatly influenced by Norman Rockwell. I am trying to make my work look real like his. I haven't had time to study portraiture work because I have been too busy doing what I do," Mary Ann Carroll said when asked about doing more portrait paintings. Carroll held a Q&A section, an autograph session, followed by displaying and selling her artwork.

Actor Tom Ligon in his home in the Greenwich Village near the window an intruder tried to come through in New York, New York.

 

Story link here.

David First, in his Brooklyn apartment, led the noise-rock band the Notekillers, who played the New York music scene in the late 1970s and early ‘80s.

Part of The New York Times Story:

'Revival for the Notekillers'

Lila Laporte at her apartment in the Flatbush section of Brooklyn. “I love people, helping people,” she said. “I love taking care of people.”

Part of New York Times Story:

'The Neediest Case Series'

Dr. Rahraw Omarzad founder of the Centre for Contemporary Art Afghanistan in Kabul, Afghanistan. In 2006 Omarzad established the only women’s art center in Afghanistan. “We taught women how to drawing and after three months we gave them hints of conceptual art and creative painting. Their art work shows the struggle and sacrifice of woman over time and is strictly open for interpretation,” said Dr. Omarzad.

Story link here.

Walter Gerhard

Hoyerswerda, Germany.

Ivete Sangalo photographed in New York City. She talked about her desire to cross over, as well as what it is that makes her music so appealing to the Brazilian mainstream.

Story can be found Here

 

 

 

 

 

Dean Bell at Paley Park in Manhattan. At the age of 40 Dean is on a mission to complete all six major marathons in one year; Tokyo, Boston, London, Berlin, Chicago, and New York. "Once I started I just asked myself, why stop," said Dean. Dean wakes up early each morning to train by running at least a 7K before starting work as an accountant. "I love it and it is my way of releasing stress. It is the only time I have control. No phone, no work. Just me and myself," said Dean. "Its my therapy and I cannot imagine my life without it." 

President Randy K. Avent at Florida Polytechnic University in Lakeland, Florida.

Young Love. 

Washington D.C.

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