Photojournalism

Photo Sight: NYC Pride March 2018

This past weekend was the New York City Pride March 2018. The streets were filled with rainbow flags, colorful outfits, lots of smiles, and a high level of energy. Check out some of the shots!

 Dancing and flag waving.

Dancing and flag waving.

 Joy & Pride.

Joy & Pride.

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 NYPD Auxiliary Officer.

NYPD Auxiliary Officer.

 Trader Joe's shopping mid parade.

Trader Joe's shopping mid parade.

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 Pride Signal.

Pride Signal.

 Presidential Baby attend the March.

Presidential Baby attend the March.

 Energy.

Energy.

Photo copyright Demetrius Freeman 2018.

Demetrius Freeman is a freelance Visual Journalist, who most frequently covers the metro section of The New York Times. For two years, he was a photographer for New York City’s Mayor Bill de Blasio. His work has been published in CNN, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Tampa Bay Times, ProPublica, and Newsweek. Demetrius has participated in several workshops and seminars including The Mountain Workshop, The Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar, The New York Times Portfolio Review, The Missouri Photo Workshop, and is an alumni of The Eddie Adams Workshop XXVII. He also supports and contributes in photography volunteer work and provide mentorship to high school photography students. Learn more and send him a note through his website, or follow him on Instagram @demetriusfreeman.


Photo Insight: PFT Commenter for The Washington Post

 Wearing dark sunglasses with an acoustic guitar slung over his shoulder, the most unlikely sports media personality on the planet stepped through the glass doors and onto 27th Street to wait for his Uber. Within 30 seconds, he was spotted. 

“Can I get your picture really quick, man? I’m your biggest fan,” said a passerby, pulling out his ear buds. “I was just listening to the show.”

PFT Commenter is used to it by now. With hair that hangs past his shoulders and ever-present dark sunglasses, he’s hardly inconspicuous. (“Like a short Kid Rock,” he jokes.) But as often as this same sidewalk scene unfolds, the context remains bizarre. PFT is commonly recognized. He’s also almost completely unknown.

(Story by: Rick Maese)

Link to story: PFT Commenter rose from an Internet ‘cesspool’ to podcasting glory.

I spent some time photographing PFT Commenter in Manhattan, New York.

 Sports podcast host PFT Commenter’s show, “Pardon My Take,” has more than 1 million listeners per episode. The man behind the character is is largely a mystery.

Sports podcast host PFT Commenter’s show, “Pardon My Take,” has more than 1 million listeners per episode. The man behind the character is is largely a mystery.

 "Pardon My Take" sticker on PFT Commenter's computer.

"Pardon My Take" sticker on PFT Commenter's computer.

 "Pardon My Take" episode recording.

"Pardon My Take" episode recording.

 “Pardon My Take” was the only sports programming to crack the most recent top-20 list from Podtrac.

“Pardon My Take” was the only sports programming to crack the most recent top-20 list from Podtrac.

 PFT Commenter’s desk includes Busch Light, red wine and Frosted Flakes.

PFT Commenter’s desk includes Busch Light, red wine and Frosted Flakes.

 PFT Commenter’s expanding portfolio also includes a late-’90s pop-punk band parody.

PFT Commenter’s expanding portfolio also includes a late-’90s pop-punk band parody.

 “Can I get your picture really quick, man? I’m your biggest fan,” said a passerby, pulling out his ear buds. “I was just listening to the show.”  PFT Commenter has maintained his anonymity even as his fame has ballooned.

“Can I get your picture really quick, man? I’m your biggest fan,” said a passerby, pulling out his ear buds. “I was just listening to the show.”

PFT Commenter has maintained his anonymity even as his fame has ballooned.

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Photos taken for The Washington Post.

Demetrius Freeman is a freelance Visual Journalist, who most frequently covers the metro section of The New York Times. For two years, he was a photographer for New York City’s Mayor Bill de Blasio. His work has been published in CNN, The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Tampa Bay Times, ProPublica, and Newsweek. Demetrius has participated in several workshops and seminars including The Mountain Workshop, The Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar, The New York Times Portfolio Review, The Missouri Photo Workshop, and is an alumni of The Eddie Adams Workshop XXVII. He also supports and contributes in photography volunteer work and provide mentorship to high school photography students. Learn more and send him a note through his website, or follow him on Instagram @demetriusfreeman.


Photo Insight: Cutting 'Old Heads' at IBM for ProPublica

For nearly a half century, IBM came as close as any company to bearing the torch for the American Dream.

As the world’s dominant technology firm, payrolls at International Business Machines Corp. swelled to nearly a quarter-million U.S. white-collar workers in the 1980s. Its profits helped underwrite a broad agenda of racial equality, equal pay for women and an unbeatable offer of great wages and something close to lifetime employment, all in return for unswerving loyalty.

But when high tech suddenly started shifting and companies went global, IBM faced the changing landscape with a distinction most of its fiercest competitors didn’t have: a large number of experienced and aging U.S. employees. (Story by PETER GOSSELIN AND ARIANA TOBIN)

Read more at ProPublica or Mother Jones.

I took photos of Marjorie Madfis and Ed Miyoshi who are ex IBM employees.

 Marjorie Madfis is the President and Executive Director of Yes She Can Inc. boutique for American Girl Dolls in White Plains, New York. Marjorie Madfis, a mother of a teen girl with autism founded Yes She Can Inc. to help teen girls and young women with autism spectrum disorders to develop transferable job skills to enable them to join the competitive workforce and achieve greater independence. 

Marjorie Madfis is the President and Executive Director of Yes She Can Inc. boutique for American Girl Dolls in White Plains, New York. Marjorie Madfis, a mother of a teen girl with autism founded Yes She Can Inc. to help teen girls and young women with autism spectrum disorders to develop transferable job skills to enable them to join the competitive workforce and achieve greater independence. 

  Resale boutique for American Girl Dolls store Girl A Gain in White Plains, New York. Marjorie Madfis, a mother of a teen girl with autism founded Yes She Can Inc. to help teen girls and young women with autism spectrum disorders to develop transferable job skills to enable them to join the competitive workforce and achieve greater independence.

 Resale boutique for American Girl Dolls store Girl A Gain in White Plains, New York. Marjorie Madfis, a mother of a teen girl with autism founded Yes She Can Inc. to help teen girls and young women with autism spectrum disorders to develop transferable job skills to enable them to join the competitive workforce and achieve greater independence.

 Collection of dolls arranged on the shelves at the resale boutique for American Girl Dolls store Girl A Gain in White Plains, New York.

Collection of dolls arranged on the shelves at the resale boutique for American Girl Dolls store Girl A Gain in White Plains, New York.

 President and Executive Director of Yes She Can Inc, Majorie Madfis work with her daughter Isabelle at her resale boutique for American Girl Dolls store Girl A Gain in White Plains, New York.

President and Executive Director of Yes She Can Inc, Majorie Madfis work with her daughter Isabelle at her resale boutique for American Girl Dolls store Girl A Gain in White Plains, New York.

 Only two weeks after IBM laid him off in December 2016, Ed Miyoshi of Hopewell Junction, New York, started work as a subcontractor to the company. But he took a $20,000-a-year pay cut. “I’m not a millionaire, so that’s a lot of money to me,” he says.

Only two weeks after IBM laid him off in December 2016, Ed Miyoshi of Hopewell Junction, New York, started work as a subcontractor to the company. But he took a $20,000-a-year pay cut. “I’m not a millionaire, so that’s a lot of money to me,” he says.

 Ed Miyoshi at the IBM facilities in Hopewell Junction.

Ed Miyoshi at the IBM facilities in Hopewell Junction.

Photos taken for ProPublica.

DO YOU HAVE INFORMATION ABOUT AGE DISCRIMINATION AT IBM?

Let ProPublica know.

Demetrius Freeman is a freelance Visual Journalist, who most frequently covers the metro section of The New York Times. For two years, he was a photographer for New York City’s Mayor Bill de Blasio. His work has been published in CNN, The New York Times, Newsweek, The Tampa Bay Times, and ProPublica. Demetrius has participated in several workshops and seminars including The Mountain Workshop, The Atlanta Photojournalism Seminar, The New York Times Portfolio Review, The Missouri Photo Workshop, and is an alumni of The Eddie Adams Workshop XXVII. He also supports and contributes in photography volunteer work and provide mentorship to high school photography students. Learn more and send him a note through his website, or follow him on Instagram @demetriusfreeman.